Are you worried about your ear,
but can’t be seen quickly by a health care provider?

In a few steps, we give you the tools and understanding to make informed decisions about your ears from home.

What you need

Illustration of a computer

A Computer or Smartphone

Illustration of an ear

An Ear!

Steps

  1. Illustration of plugging in the endoscope and its light turning on.

    Begin setting up your endoscope (ear camera) by plugging it in and make sure it is on via light.

    HELPFUL TIPS

  2. Illustation showing to pull the ear back.

    Pull the ear up and back. This aligns the ear canal to allow a full view.

    Illustration of an endoscope connected to a laptop.

    Watch the endoscope as it enters the ear canal, and then watch the screen as you advance to the ear drum.

    HELPFUL TIPS

    • Illustration of alcohol cleaning wipes
      If you encounter earwax, remove scope and clean your endoscope with an alcohol wipe. Defog solution is also helpful.
  3. Upload video to Otograph.

    HELPFUL TIPS

  4. You’re done! Time to compare your ear.

    Need more info?

    Check out our helpful resources & tutorials at the top of each page under How To.

About Us

This site is a home for parents (or the curious) to evaluate their own ears at home. In pooling our collective experiences and using the power of numbers, we are creating resources to empower parents to make more informed decisions about their children’s ears.

Learn more about the ear health of your child using our comparison tool.

About Ear Infections

Ear infections are the most common sickness that brings kids to see a doctor1,2 and the number one reason children are prescribed antibiotics.3 Despite ear infections being near universal, as a parent it is a challenge to be sure if a child is sick because of a problem with their ear, or if they are unwell for something else entirely. Sometimes, diagnosing ear infections challenges even our best doctors and nurses. We think there is a better way.

1 https://www.aafp.org/dam/AAFP/documents/patient_care/clinical_recommendations/aom_qanda.pdf

2 Vaz LE, Kleinman KP, et al. Recent Trends in Outpatient Antibiotic Use in Children. Pediatrics. 2014 Mar; 133(3): 375–385.

3 Grijalva CG, Nuorti JP, Griffin MR. Antibiotic prescription rates for acute respiratory tract infections in US ambulatory settings. JAMA. 2009 Aug 19;302(7):758-66.